Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

ISSN: 1540-9295

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Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment Q1 Unclaimed

Wiley-Blackwell United States
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Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment is a benefit of membership of the Ecological Society of America. International in scope and interdisciplinary in approach, Frontiers focuses on current ecological issues and environmental challenges. Frontiers covers all aspects of ecology, the environment, and related subjects, focusing on global issues, broadly impacting research, cross-disciplinary or multi-country endeavors.

Type: Journal

Type of Copyright:

Languages: English

Open Access Policy: Open Choice

Type of publications:

Publication frecuency: -

Metrics

Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

4,162

SJR Impact factor

151

H Index

133

Total Docs (Last Year)

341

Total Docs (3 years)

2608

Total Refs

1997

Total Cites (3 years)

184

Citable Docs (3 years)

8,7

Cites/Doc (2 years)

19,61

Ref/Doc


Best articles

A new generation of climate-change experiments: events, not trends

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A reply to Millspaugh and Gitzen

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A social-ecological framework for "micromanaging" microbial services

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Adaptive capacity and learning to learn as leverage for social-ecological resilience

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Ancient art serving marine conservation

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Are livestock weight gains affected by black-tailed prairie dogs?

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Are natural history collections coming to an end as time-series?

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Are predators good for your health? Evaluating evidence for top-down regulation of zoonotic disease reservoirs

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Bigwigs as coauthors: a response to Leimuet al.

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Bio-energy in the black

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Business, as usual

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Collaboration and conflict in international ecological research

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SHOW MORE ARTICLES

Confronting publication bias in marine reserve meta-analyses

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Cut! Could the dragon do that again, please?

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Dispatches

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Dispatches

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Ecoliteracy in informal science education settings

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Ecologists, environmentalists, and the problem with labels

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Ecosystems and human well-being in the Sustainable Development Goals

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Emerging technological and cultural shifts advancing drylands research and management

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Faculty response

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Failure of the Lacey Act to protect US ecosystems against animal invasions

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Farewell to Laws of Nature

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Fixing the leaky pipe: increasing recruitment of underrepresented groups in ecology

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